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Stormwater Erosion & Sedimentation


Compost Berm I

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Compost Berm II

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Compost Berm III

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Compost Berm IV

As non-point source pollutants are captured in the Bio-filter; infinite bacteria will break down the organic compounds. This Food Residual Compost is unscreened. The large particle size creates stability, and allows for good infiltration.

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Compost Berm V

This small berm, breaks the waterÂ’s velocity, and diverts the water volume, into an area of high infiltration.

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Using Partially Composted Wood Mulch

Partially composted Wood Mulch (PCWM) does an excellent job of storm water detention, is environmentally beneficial and does a good job of removing suspended clay particles, sediment and non-point source pollutants.

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PCWM Berm I

PCWM is economical, easy to install and does a far superior job than silt fence.

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PCWM Berm II

This berm will redirect heavy storm water flow into the pasture where the water will infiltrate and help recharge the water table.

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PCWM Berm III

The area here was regraded to create a more even flow of the storm water.

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PCWM Berm IV

The food waste compost berm was over a year old. It had been driven over hundreds of times. The material had started to clog from the sediment it had filtered out. It had done a terrific job, but now it was soil and loaded with earth worms. So we fed it to the trees. It was time for a new filter berm.

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PCWM Berm V

This is the third of four berms we use on our dirt and gravel road. A large amount of storm water builds up at this point. Some of this water will flow into areas of high infiltration. Trees with their vast root systems and a good layer of decomposed organic matter make an excellent sink for storm water.

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PCWM Berm VI

My assistant Lulu Alex gets a good work out with the pitch fork. Compost berms can easily be installed with a dump truck, a wheelbarrow, a pitch fork, a flat shovel and strong back. On construction sites a loader can be used to place the compost.

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PCWM Berm VII

Here Mark McConnell adjusts the height and width of the berm. Dressing up the berm insures better control of the storm water.

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PCWM Berm VIII

Size, shape and density will determine the flow of water through the berm.

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PCWM Berm IX

A job well done, let it rain.

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